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    Science Club Guidelines

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The North Carolina Museum of Life and Science shares some basic principles for Science Clubs:

Let STUDENTS take the lead. photo of girls testing their catapults
Build on their interests. Let them pick topics, experiments, and activities to do.
Take time to DO science.
Give students time to explore, observe, handle materials, test ideas, and talk about what they are exploring and learning. Provide time to repeat experiments, to practice skills, to research more information, and to heighten understandings.
Listen and talk WITH students.
Encourage all students to talk and to share their experiences, questions, and ideas. Listen carefully and talk about what they see, think, and feel. Ask questions that can have more than one answer.
Science is about probing questions and searching for answers.
Model that it is okay, in fact necessary, to not have all the answers. Have students search out information as they observe experiments, go to the library, talk with others, and form their own theories based on their experiences.
Show enthusiasm!
Enthusiasm about science is catching. Let students see your excitement about their projects, experiments, and discoveries.
Catch everyday science moments.
Science opportunities often happen when you least expect them. Check out science around you—a spider’s web, soil erosion on a rainy day, a broken TV, a local community recycling or environmental problem.
Practice Safety.
Teach and model good safety habits. Teach students how to prevent accidents and what to do if one happens. Use materials that are nontoxic and appropriate for the club's age level. Supervise students when using heat or chemicals. Remove hazards like cleaning materials, poisons, sharp objects, or things that break easily. Read and follow safety labels on materials and chemicals.

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